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The Ultimate Guide to Gratitude, appreciation-bio-hacking tools, and the effects of focusing on the blessings in our lives on our health.

Repetitive negative thoughts can kill us. Slowly but surely. The mechanism by which a thought pattern can cut our healthspan short so effectively is that thoughts evoke emotions. And emotions directly effect production of hormones. When we focus more on the negative things in life, we suffer over exposure to the stress hormone Cortisol. This leads to high blood pressure, poor sleep patterns, harmful coping habits, like overeating, and a host of other issues that are all, at the end of the day, health related.

On the upside, if our thoughts can kill, they can also heal! Shifting our negative thought patterns to focus on the good things in our lives can counteract the damage. In this article, we’ll go over:

  • How we are biologically programmed with a negativity bias
  • How gratitude physically reprograms us for better health
  • Simple actions you can take today to extend your healthspan through gratitude

What is Negativity Bias?

Negativity bias is our natural, biological tendency to focus on negative factors around us. It is a survival mechanism that helped our ancient ancestors survive by anticipating danger before it happened. This survival mechanism required our ancestors to pay more attention to the bad things than the good things. They could afford for good things to come again later. However, if a threat caught them unaware, they might not live to try again [1].

In the modern-day, we do not have a saber tooth tiger lurking around the corner. Instead, we have a host of other uncertainties like the pandemic, novel viruses, toxic workplaces, uncertain economies, job instability, manipulative family members, divorce, heartbreak and other threats to our well-being. It often feels like we can not ‘unplug’ even for a moment or we will be caught unaware.

How Does Negativity Bias Affect Our Health?

maya elhalal healthspan hacking

Negativity bias creates stress and anxiety. Short, brief doses can be good for the body, as it encourages us to do something about the source of the stress. However, our modern society produces severe and chronic levels of stress.

Here are a few troubling statistics about how stress directly affects your health [2]:

  • In a study by Everyday Health, over 33% of the respondents reported going to the doctor for stress-related health issues.
  • 57% of respondents to another study reported they were paralyzed by stress.
  • Stress caused sleep deprivation in 66% of American workers in 2018.
  • Work-related stress causes 120,000 deaths yearly
  • Both women and men cope with stress through habits bad for our healthspan like drinking extra caffeine (37%), smoking (27%), overeating and snacking (46% women, 26% men), and illicit drugs (12% men and 2% women).

Why does stress cause health problems? 

Our bodies are made to use stress as a short-term boost to help us overcome a threat. Chronic stress, however, leads to a lot of wear and tear on our bodies in the form of high blood pressure, fat-building cortisol, and fatigue. We also tend to let our healthy habits falter as we seek to cope with that stress. As a result, our quality of life and eventually our healthspan suffers.

Our bodies are made to use stress as a short-term boost to help us overcome a threat. Chronic stress, however, leads to a lot of wear and tear on our bodies in the form of high blood pressure, fat-building cortisol, and fatigue. We also tend to let our healthy habits falter as we seek to cope with that stress. As a result, our quality of life and eventually our healthspan suffers.

Luckily, the biological effects of stress, anxiety, and negativity can be counteracted without drugs or expensive treatments. We can change our thought processes by focusing on the things in our life that we are grateful for.

How Does Practicing Gratitude Overcome Negativity Bias?

What is Gratitude?

Gratitude is actively expressing our appreciation for what we have. Rather than focus on the stressors and uncertainties in life, we acknowledge there are good things in the world. We also acknowledge the gifts and benefits we have received from other people, circumstances, and higher powers [3].

What Does Gratitude Look Like?

Just like stress has physical symptoms like headaches, tightness in the chest, and tension, gratitude can be consciously felt. 

Jing Lee, founder of @pacificpause describes it as “…warmth in the body, a sense of grounded-ness, a slowing of the breath, spaciousness in the chest and heart, uncontrollable tears or an automatic smile. I know when I am experiencing gratitude because it’s not just a concept in my head, I can feel it in my body. [4]”

How Does Gratitude Affect Health?

Breaking the stress of negative bias has profound effects on our healthspan:

  • Reduces stress and improves sleep quality, which helps build resilience [5][6][7][8].
  • People who regularly express gratitude have more grey brain matter [5]
  • Gratitude acts as a natural anti-depressant, and you can build the neural pathways to make the anti-depressive benefits permanent! [5][6][8]
  • Stops stress on the limbic system, which controls emotions, memory, and body functions. Activating the system with gratitude is reported to shorten recovery times and contribute to better feelings of well-being [5][7][8].
  • Gratitude releases dopamine, which helps regulate and reduce pain [5][6][8].
  • Gratitude dramatically reduces the stress hormone cortisol. This stress hormone is a big contributor to belly fat, high ‘bad’ cholesterol and blood pressure, and other health factors [5].

These are just the tip of the iceberg in how a change in how we view the world affects the condition of our health. 

Bio-Hacks to Practice Gratitude Today

Practicing gratitude is an easy and inexpensive way to improve your healthspan. Here are a few tips and practices to try today!

Be Patient With Yourself

Gratitude is a process. It will not work its magic all at once, and you will find yourself sliding into old negative thought patterns at first. Like any habit or a new skill, it will take time to master. Be kind to yourself when you find yourself stressing over the negative things in life. The last think you want is to add that to your list of stressors. Take a deep breath, acknowledge yourself for the awareness, and gently course correct. Gratitude is a muscle that builds overtime.

Try Out Journaling

For most people, journaling all the positive things you experience can help bring on a more positive bias thought pattern. It is more than listing out the good things though- you need to reflect on them and allow yourself to feel that appreciation and calm of having good things in your life. 

Try listing out five things you are happy to have in your life in the morning. Record good memories after an event. End the day with a brief letter to yourself about something good about the day. This will help your mind keep on the lookout for good things to write down and distract yourself from some of the negative.

Write a Letter of Gratitude

Sit down and write to someone who has contributed to your day (or life) in a positive way. You do not have to send it unless you want to. Just the act of writing out the letter will be enough to evoke positive thoughts and emotions.

Gratitude Visit

Going a step further from a letter, visit someone who has had a positive effect in your life to express your gratitude face to face. Maybe treat them to their favorite tea or reminisce about a moment that they made a huge impact on you. This activity fulfills both a focus on positives in life and a social need to be around positive and supportive people.

Find a Gratitude Buddy

It could be a spouse, child, friend, or companion online. The goal is to check in daily and spend a minute or two sharing positive news and things you are grateful for.

Take a Walk

Mixing the practice of observing the beautiful and positive parts of your surroundings with the endorphins produced with light walking, cycling, or wheelchair travel can significantly improve your mood and feelings of well-being.

Meditation/Gratitude Ritual

Take a few minutes of your day to focus on the good things you are grateful for. Find a distraction-free area, put your phone on silent, close your eyes, and just focus on the good things in your life.

Volunteer

Assist at a homeless center, a soup kitchen, a children’s hospital, or another good cause. Seeing the struggles of others and helping them in a small but meaningful way helps us put our own troubles and blessings into perspective!

An Attitude of Gratitude Extends Your Healthspan

Negative bias and the stress it produces is easy and inexpensive to counter. Live a longer, healthier, and more fulfilling life by focusing on the things you are grateful for. The psychological and physical benefits will greatly improve your healthspan!

Want more practical tips to increase your healthspan and longevity? [Insert a call to action you want the reader to do next here].


Citations

[1] Hanson, Rick, Ph.D. (2021). Taking in the Good vs. The Negativity Bias. Retrieved 5 September 2021, from https://www.sfsu.edu/~holistic/documents/Spring_2014/GoodvsNeg_Bias.pdf

[2] Heckman, W. (2021). 42 Worrying Workplace Stress Statistics – The American Institute of Stress. Retrieved 5 September 2021, from https://www.stress.org/42-worrying-workplace-stress-statistics-2

[3] Gratitude Definition | What Is Gratitude. (2021). Retrieved 6 September 2021, from https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/topic/gratitude/definition

[4] Jing, L. (2021). What Gratitude Really Feels Like. Retrieved 6 September 2021, from https://thriveglobal.com/stories/what-gratitude-really-feels-like/

[5] The Neuroscience of Gratitude and How It Affects Anxiety & Grief. (2019). Retrieved 6 September 2021, from https://positivepsychology.com/neuroscience-of-gratitude/

[6] What Science Reveals About Gratitude’s Impact on the Brain – Mindful. (2019). Retrieved 9 September 2021, from https://www.mindful.org/what-the-brain-reveals-about-gratitude/

[7] Your brain on gratitude: How a neuroscientist used his research to heal from grief. (2021). Retrieved 9 September 2021, from https://whyy.org/segments/your-brain-on-gratitude-how-a-neuroscientist-used-his-research-to-heal-from-grief/

[8] Why Gratitude Is Good. (2021). Retrieved 9 September 2021, from https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/why_gratitude_is_good

Collagen is the main structural protein in our body. As we age collagen production declines. Research shows that collagen consumption from nutrition or supplements could improve skin health and reduce wrinkles visibility. Collagen could also lower the impact of damage from sun exposure and time on our skin.

Most man and women would like to look and feel younger than their chronological age. Some of you might say: I am quite okay with looking older, white hair is sexy and wrinkles are a sign of a life fully lived. But what if I’ll ask you, what if their was a pill that would make us look and feel younger and healthier, wouldn’t you take it?

When looking at the 50 billion dollars a year cosmetics industry in the US, we can assume thet the answer is probably yes. The cosmetics industry can be divided into six main categories with skin care being the largest out them all and accounts for 36% percent of the global cosmetics market (1). The cosmetics products in their well designed packages promises their consumers they would stay young for many more years.  But what do they actually do?

How do skin care products work?

To understand the way skin care products work, we need to first understand how wrinkles are created. In the tissues of humans and animals there is a structural support network surrounding the cells called the extracellular matrix (ECM). In our skin, the ECM also relates to the elasticity of the cells.

Cells are created from the loss of the ECM. Sun exposure, especially to UVA radiation and other environmental factors like cigarette smoke and pollution, breaks the collagen molecules and its surrounding elastic tissues in the ECM. The loss of these, according to theory, causes wrinkles.

Skin care products address this problem in different ways. Some products contains anti-oxidants that improve UV protection like vitamins C and E. Other products contain retinoic acid, a metabolite of vitamin A1 that promotes collagen and fibrillin in the skin cells (2).

This are outside in approaches but if the problem relates to the inside of our cells would it be logical to add an inside out approach to skin care? 

Enter collagen.

What is collagen?

Collagen is the main structural protein in the body’s of animals and humans. Collagen has an important role in the health of bones, tendons, ligaments and muscles. Collagen makes from 25% to 35% of the whole-body protein content and 80% of the proteins in facial skin. Collagen is produced in our body naturally but from the ages of 18-29 its production declines, as we reach 40  we can lose up to 1% of our collagen a year, and around age 80 collagen production could get up to 75% less than in teens (3,4).

Recent studies show that consumption of collagen from external sources has potential benefit for skin health, joint pain, and bone density.  In this article we’ll focus on the possible benefit of collagen for skin health and wrinkle visibility.

What is Nutricosmetics and how does it work?

Research shows that we can rely not only on expensive cosmetics products and use food for improving our skin health. We can add collagen to our nutrition by eating animal products like meat, fish, chicken skin and bone broth. The down side of this approach is that collagen molecules from natural sources are usually too big to enter intact to our skin cells.

Why it is important to consume hydrolyzed collagen? 

For maximal effect we should add to our nutrition hydrolyzed collagen. Studies show that after hydrolysis, collagen peptides molecules are small enough to enter completely into our cells and promote collagen production in our body.

But not all types of hydrolyzed collagen are identical in their bioactive qualities. The type and location of the cutting of collagen is also important. In recent years researchers developed collagen that gets more efficiently into the bloodstream and that can work on the deep layers of the skin. This is a breakthrough in nutricosmetics because when bioactive collagen segments reach the deep into the skin they change the balance of collagen production. They promote faster production of new collagen in the cell and at the same time delay its destruction.

Collagen improves skin health

A double blind study, which included 105 woman in the ages of 45-65, examined the effect of 2.5 grams of bioactive collagen peptides. The participants who received collagen showed significant improvement in elastin and pro-collagen in the skin cells. Most interestingly, was the visible decrease in the depth of the wrinkles in the sides of the eyes.

Further research from the recent years showed lowering in laugh lines (6), increased skin moisturization (7), and deceases cellulite visibility (8).

How to add collagen to our nutrition

The mentioned studies show that we can rely not only on expensive cosmetics products and add an inside-out approach to skin care. We can add collagen to our nutrition by eating animal products like meat, fish, chicken skin and bone broth. The down side of this approach is that collagen molecules from natural sources are usually too big to enter intact to our skin cells.

For maximal effect we should add to our nutrition hydrolyzed collagen. Studies show that after hydrolysis, collagen peptides molecules are small enough to enter completely into our cells and promote collagen production in our body (5).

Most studies show that the minimal amount for visible effect is 2.5 grams.

Using collagen supplements is usually safe rarely have any side effects, but just in case, consult with a health professional that can customize the amount taken for you individual needs.

In our blog we offer many health and lifestyle habits for promoting health span. It seems like collagen can help not only to age better but to look good while doing it.

References

  1. https://www.statista.com/statistics/243742/revenue-of-the-cosmetic-industry-in-the-us/
  2. https://www.chemistryworld.com/features/the-science-of-skincare/5494.article
  3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1606623/
  4. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/17200942/ 
  5. https://www.karger.com/Article/Abstract/355523 
  6. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/10498764/
  7. https://www.karger.com/Article/Abstract/351376 
  8. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26561784/

We tend to think about lifestyle factors as what you eat and how often you work out. But we now know the quality of your social life plays a big role in longevity too.

I’ve seen up close and personal the horrific effects social isolation can do. And as we go into another lockdown, I remind myself to make it a daily habit to connect with the people in my life who will be spending it alone.

The Italian island of Sardinia has more than six times as many centenarians as the mainland and ten times as many as North America. Why? According to psychologist Susan Pinker, it’s not a sunny disposition or a low-fat, gluten-free diet that keeps the islanders healthy — it’s their emphasis on close personal relationships and face-to-face interactions.

Genes account for 25% of healthspan. The other 75%? The answer Susan Pinker suggests may surprise you, and COVID-19 makes this insight relevant than ever.

This talk is highly recommended as pre-lockdown entertainment:

Can you remember who you were and how you felt a couple of decades ago? And, if so, can that information help you to reverse aging?

We often hear the phrase ‘act your age’ and interpret it to mean to stop acting like a child. Yet, research by distinguished Harvard Social Psychologist Ellen Langer has turned that notion on its head. Professor Langer is convinced that our thoughts have a lot to do with the ageing process. This has led her to focus her research efforts on unifying the mind and the body in order to reverse the aging process. This is in contrast to the conventional medical process of treating the mind and body separately.

Turning Back the Aging Clock

Professor Langer is the author of eleven books, the most famous of which is entitled CounterClockwise. In that book, she relates an experiment that she conducted in 1979. In the experiment, 16 men aged in their late 70s or early 80s, were taken to a retreat that was made to look exactly as it would have in 1959. Every detail, down to clothing and TV shows replicated that era. (1)

The men were also treated as if they were twenty years younger. They had to make their own beds, assist with dinner prep and carry their own bags. The men were divided into two groups, with the first being told to act as if they were actually living in 1959. The second group were told to reminisce about their past life.

The results of the study were very interesting. All of the men showed improvements in hearing, memory and vision. Yet, the men in the first group, who acted as if it were 1959, also improved their gait, manual dexterity, flexibility and even posture. Two thirds of them also improved their intelligence score.

It was also noticed that, even though most of the men had been largely reliant on others prior to arrival, they all managed to act independently when expected to do so. 

Professor Langer has conducted a number of follow up studies over the last few decades that have confirmed her findings that the way we think radically affects how we age. One of these has come to be known as the Chambermaid Study. In that study, hotel maids were taught to view their work as healthy exercise. This change in mindset led to the women reducing their Body Mass Index (BMI), lost weight and reduced their blood pressure. (2)

Ellen J Langer
Ellen J. Langer, Ph.D.
Professor of psychology, Harvard university and founder of langer mindfulness institute
Photo taken from www.familyactionnetwork.net

In another study, it was found that a person’s level of satisfaction or dissatisfaction with aging was a determining factor in how long they lived. Study participants who had a positive view of aging lived an average of seven and a half years longer than those who did not.

Here is Professor Langer on the implications of her research . . .

Our attitudes, ideas, and beliefs are at least as important to health as our diets and our doctors. Our mindless decisions—our deference to doctors’ opinions, our willingness to accept diagnoses, even the way we talk about our illnesses—can have drastic effects on our physical well-being.

Ellan Langer

5 Key Healthspan Hacks

As a result of her life’s work, Professor Langer has some great heath hacks that we can all apply in order to improve our longevity and live more healthy, fruitful lives. Here are a five healthspan hacks that we should all put into practice:

  • Be aware of what is going on around us. Notice new things and be inquisitive about them.
  • Refuse to conform to an aging stereotype. Take inspiration from our superagers  [link to superagers articles] and break out of the box that society would love to confine you to.
  • Do not accept that getting older means getting weaker and sicker. Expect to be better each day. Commit yourself to healthy nutrition and regular exercise every day.
  • Do not allow yourself to be over helped by others. If you can carry your own bag, make your own bed and help out with the dinner, do so. Mollycoddling will make you older, whereas doing things for yourself will keep you young.
  • View yourself as a valued individual rather than a statistic or a number.

Summary

The way you think has a clear and direct impact upon the way you age, both physically and mentally. By thinking and acting younger, not accepting that you are over the hill and doing things for yourself, you will enhance your longevity and turn back the hands of time.

References

  1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6615788/
  2. https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=17792517

Charlie Munger has always had a brilliant mind. In fact, he is widely regarded as possessing one of the smartest brains of the 20th century. Yet, perhaps the most amazing thing about this amazing man is that, at 96 years of age, he hasn’t lost a single iota of his incredible cognitive ability. He still sits as vice president of the world’s most successful investment company, Berkshire Hathaway, alongside his lifelong pal, 90 year old Warren Buffet.

According to Buffet, Charlie . . .

Marches to the beat of his own music, and it’s music like virtually no one else is listening to.

Over the course of his nine decades, Charlie has gained expertise in the areas of meteorology, law, psychology, economics, physics, biology and history. He is a true polymath who is an expert in a wide range of fields. 

Charlie is famous for his Inversion Principle, epitomized by the statement . . .

All I want to know is where I’m going to die, so I’ll never go there.

At the rate that Charlie’s going, he may just be right. He is a poster child for the benefits of keeping your brain and body active as you age. Here is another quote from Charlie that we can all learn from . . .

Spend each day trying to be a little wiser than you were when you woke up. Discharge your duties faithfully and well. Systematically you get ahead, but not necessarily in fast spurts. Nevertheless, you build discipline by preparing for fast spurts. Slug it out one inch at a time, day by day. At the end of the day – if you live long enough – most people get what they deserve.

In 1944 Polish candy factory owner Yisrael Kristal lost his wife and two children after the family was transported to Auschwitz concentration camp. Kristal survived, making it though the brutal 1945 death march. After the war he went back to his home town where he met fellow Hholocaust survivor Bat Sheva.  They married and began a new life together, The couple married, started a family, and opened a new candy factory in Haifa. Yisreal lived on to became the Guinness world record oldest Holocaust survivor in 2010, and lived to see his great grandchildren thrive in Israel. 

Throughout the most part of his long life, Yisrael enjoyed good health. He died surrounded by his extended family in 2017, just 5 days short of his 114th birthday. Kristal was a middle aged man when he lost everything, and in the seven decades that followed the war, he got to start a new life and live it fully. 

Yisrael Kristal 
Taken from jpost.com (photo credit: COURTESY OF FAMILY)

Living Longer But Not Healthier

Celebrating life with such healthy longevity is a rare individual achievement. Yet, as a species, we have made extraordinary improvement in the longevity stakes over the 150 years. During that time the average global lifespan has more than doubled.  A two-fold increase in longevity in a blink of an eye on the evolutionary time scale, is a remarkable human achievement. However, the extended human lifespan has brought with it some major adverse effects. Consequently, for most of us, an increase in lifespan iis not equal to an increase in healthspan. 

Credit: OurWorldInData.org

As we age, put chances of getting sick increase. In fact, the risk of suffering from such conditions as cardiovascular disease, cancer and Alzheimer’s disease goes up exponentially with every year we add to our lives. Arthritis, osteoporosis, type 2 diabetes, and many other chronic diseases are all associated with aging. In 2020, more than half of Americans 65 and older are being treated for multiple chronic conditions. A typical chronic combination of conditions is diabetes together with high blood pressure and a heart condition. 

A 2011 study by the world economic forum projected that by the year 2030 the cost for treating chronic illness worldwide would exceed 47 trillion dollars. The rising cost of managing the ill health of old age is devastating and the impact on the quality of life of a chronically ill individual is immeasurable. 

Longer lives have come with a dire unintended downside. In extending lifespan we hoped for a commensurate better quality of life. Instead, it seems we have stretched our limits beyond sustainable biological longevity. As a result, ill health in old age, and the economic healthcare burden that can bring economies to their knees, is inevitable. 

Or is it? 

In this article series, we explore breakthroughs in longevity science and biotechnology that suggest it is time for us to rethink the notions that extended lifespan and health are mutually exclusive. As technology advances and we learn more about biological aging, there are more reasons to be optimistic that good health over most of a long life may be possible.

 Imminent even. 

Why Do We Get Sick When We Get Older?  

Longevity and health are an age old human desire. Every culture has its tales of longevity outliers. In the Bible, Methuselah lived to the ripe old age of 960, with many Bible patriarchs living well into the multiple centuries. Yet, for millions of years the average life span was between20 and 30 years. A few millennia ago it began to gradually climb until it reach into the early 40s in the second part of the 9th century.

The burning question driving scientists globally is, with the rare exception of centenarians, could the reason we get sick when we age be that in doubling lifespan we have broken some irrefutable law of biology?

What we do know is that risk of suffering from cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimers, arthritis, osteoporosis, type 2 diabetes, and many other chronic conditions goes up as we get older. These illness are very different in nature from the infectious diseases that contribute to mortality in the early parts of life. 

Is There a Common Root Cause to the Diseases of Old Age? 

The answer, growing insights from longevity science tell us, is the process of biological aging. 

Gerontologists refer to it as senescence. Simply put, it is a gradual and ultimately fatal deterioration of function that results from accumulated damage in the body. This appears to be a deadly side effect of essential metabolic processes in a biological economy that from middle age on suffers from diminishing garbage disposal and repair resources. 

Think of this as biological operating expenses that rise exponentially from middle age until,l eventually, running the business of staying alive becomes unsustainable. In the past we didn’t live much beyond middle age. 

Age related illnesses came along as we took evolution into our own hands and deliberately ventured humanity to new frontiers of longevity. 

Does that mean that ill health in old age is inevitable? Or can a biohealth hacking focus allow us to live longer AND healthier lives? In Part Two of this multi part series we search for answers.

For Part Two: Is Living a Long Healthy Life Luck of the Draw? CLICK HERE

On October 1st, 2020, some of the world’s most renowned longevity exports gathered in the beautiful ski resort of San Mortiz, Switzerland. They were there for the Longevity Investors Conference to speak before an audience of potential financial investors. 

Longevity is primed to be the next massive investment opportunity, with conference co-host Marc Bernegger saying . . .

Longevity will become one of the largest investment opportunities in the coming decades. It will disrupt not only the healthcare system, but society and the economy in general. Longevity is a topic that moves investors. Besides making a nice profit, they share an interest in staying healthy and living longer.

A key speaker at the conference, Aubrey De Grey, stated that latest innovations in cell repair are capable of transforming a 70-year old into the biological equivalent of a 40 year old. The only thing impeding such progress, De Grey, who created the SENS Research Center in California, claimed, was the amount of funding. 

The Longevity Investors Conference was designed to address that need. The enthusiastic reception that the speakers received from the investors portends positive outcomes. Lengthening healthspan may be imminent, but only if it is sufficiently funded in the coming years. That remains to be seen.

When it comes to runners, Anne McGowan could be considered a late bloomer. She didn’t start pounding the pavement until she was 49. Anne began running to help her cope with the loss of her husband, yet she soon fell in love with the activity.

Born in 1925, Anne has been running regularly since 1974. In 1991, in the wake of a mastectomy, she ran in the 1991 National Senior Games, in which 50+ athletes who have qualified at regional level compete for national honors. As well as competing on the track in the 100, 200 and 400 yard sprints, Anne has also gone toe to toe with the best seniors in the country in such power events as the hammer throw, discus, javelin and long jump.

Anne is now 95 years old and still going strong. In fact, she’s in better shape than most people half her age. She is still competing at the National Senior Games, being just one of eight super agers to have competed in every game since their inception in 1987. Anne is a sterling example that over 80 doesn’t have to mean over the hill!